Different Types of Earl Grey Tea - lovemytea.net Different Types of Earl Grey Tea - lovemytea.net

Different Types of Earl Grey Tea


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Earl Grey tea is one of the most popular teas in the West. This black tea with hints of citrus is a perfect introduction to tea. It is great served hot or cold, and pairs well with food. That’s why it is a favorite for afternoon tea and preferred by many tea drinkers throughout the world. Explore its history and the great variety of Earl Grey available.

Earl Grey is a black tea, so it usually has a bold flavor. Unlike orange pekoe (which is a tea grade named for the Dutch royal House of Orange-Nassau rather than the fruit or the color orange), Earl Grey has a citrusy flavor.

Earl Grey’s citrusy taste is due to the addition of natural or synthetic bergamot oil. The bergamot orange is a type of aromatic citrus fruit that is usually grown in the Mediterranean. Bergamot oil is extracted from the skin of the bergamot fruit.

Types of Earl Grey Tea

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  • Earl Grey Black Tea

For some, the original Earl Grey tea is the best Earl Grey tea. They enjoy the simplicity of earthy black tea leaves blended with citrusy bergamot oranges. The tea is typically made using either Chinese black tea or Indian black teas as a base. 

  • London Fog Tea

London Fog tea is a lesser-known Earl Grey blend but is increasingly popular. It can now be found at major coffeehouse chains like Starbucks. This Earl Grey blend offers a flavor profile that is both floral and sweet as well as bitter and sour. London Fog tea is made by blending traditional black tea leaves and bergamot orange rinds with milk and vanilla syrup. It is rich, frothy, and subtly sweet adding a new dimension to the classic blend. It’s a great drink choice for warming up in the fall or cold winter months.

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  • Lavender Earl Grey Tea

Lavender Earl Grey tea blends the floral notes of lavender petals with the citrus tang of bergamot oranges. The tea is one of our bestsellers thanks to its unique flavor profile. Each sip offers a layered flavor featuring earthy black tea notes with floral hints and citrus undertones. The aroma of this tea is also out of this world with a blend of lemony and orangey tones belied by floral undertones.

  • French Earl Grey

Earl Grey can be mixed with a variety of flower petals to create new flavor profiles. Some of the more common floral additions include jasmine and hibiscus. French Earl Grey, however, blends Earl Grey tea with rose petals or French blue cornflowers. It’s a beautifully delicate tea with subtly sweet flavors and floral undertones.

  • Lady Grey Tea

Lady Grey puts a new spin on that classic black tea with natural bergamot. The name “Lady Grey” is trademarked by tea brand Twinings and comes in two varieties: Cornflower Lady Grey and Citrus Lady Grey. The Cornflower Earl Grey blend substitutes Cornflower oranges for the classic Italian oranges while the Citrus Lady Grey uses Seville oranges. 

  • Russian Earl Grey

Russian Earl Grey is a citrus-heavy take on the classic black tea blend. This type of Earl Grey uses a host of citrus peels and lemongrass to play up the tart and lemony notes of the bergamot. The result is a citrusy drink that invigorates taste buds and offers a refreshing and tingling body. The tea often includes citrus fruits like lemons, orange peels, bergamot, cornflower petals, and lemongrass. It’s like the vibrantly colored steeples of orthodox Russian churches blended into a delightfully vibrant drink.

  • Rooibos Earl Grey 

Rooibos Earl Grey is a caffeine-free alternative to traditional Earl Grey. The black tea leaves are replaced with herbal rooibos tea leaves. Rooibos tea is a South African tea that is cultivated in the mountainous Cederberg region of the country. The tea features tart and sweet notes similar to cranberries. Since this blend is caffeine-free it’s perfect for enjoying Earl Grey all day long.

These are the different types of Earl Grey Tea one can try.

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